UL/Frank McCourt Summer School, New York, June 2017

UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK/FRANK MCCOURT CREATIVE WRITING SUMMER SCHOOL, 2017. GLUCKSMAN IRELAND HOUSE, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, JUNE 22nd to 25thSPONSORED BY SHANNON AIRPORT

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Shannon Airport and the University of Limerick have teamed up to present the 2017 Frank McCourt Creative Writing Summer School at NYU’s beautiful Glucksman Ireland House, 22nd – 25th June. Study writing in a fun and relaxed atmosphere with bestselling authors Joseph O’Connor, Donal Ryan and Sarah Moore Fitzgerald, poet Mary O’Malley, UL professor Eoin Devereux and others. Speaking from New York about the Summer School, Loretta Glucksman said: “It’s our joy at Glucksman Ireland House to help link Frank’s two cities, Limerick and New York. He remains beloved in both.”

Welcoming the announcement of the 2017 programme, UL President, Professor Don Barry remarked: “The UL Frank McCourt Creative Writing Summer School in New York links two literary worlds – on the banks of the Shannon and the shores of the Hudson – that fired our much-missed Frank’s imagination. The very promising 2017 programme will draw on his unique legacy to inspire new generations of creative writers”.

UL Professor of Creative Writing, Joseph O’Connor, added: ‘The Summer School offers a taste of Creative Writing as we teach it at UL, with the emphasis on enjoyment, collegiality, mutual respect and love of words, in a community of writers working together. We hope the fine range of authors we’re offering this year will make it an experience to remember.”

Highlights will include readings by JOSEPH O’CONNOR, broadcaster, playwright and author of eight novels including the million-selling ‘Star of the Sea’. Booker Prize-longlisted DONAL RYAN, author of ‘The Spinning Heart’ (recently voted Irish Novel of the Decade) will reveal the secrets of writing captivating short stories. Acclaimed Young-Adult author and UL professor SARAH MOORE FITZGERALD will outline those essential motivational and time-management tools that all writers need.

Celebrated Irish poet, MARY O’MALLEY, will offer exciting sessions on ‘Poetry and the City’, focusing on the streetscape of the Lower Manhattan/Greenwich Village where the Summer School has its base, and the counterculture of downtown NYC provides a vivid context for PROF EOIN DEVEREUX’s talk on long-time New York resident David Bowie.

KERRY NEVILLE joins us as this year’s special guest. Teacher, Huffington Post contributor and award-winning short-story writer (‘Necessary Lies’), Kerry is a dazzlingly talented wordsmith whose take on the creative process in our contemporary era is fascinating. Writer in Residence for the Summer School, DARRAGH McKEON, author of acclaimed debut novel ‘All that is Solid Melts into Air’, will be on hand to offer advice, answer questions, give his insights over coffee, share perspectives and respond to students.

Our Guest of Honour, ELLEN FREY McCOURT, Frank’s wife, remarks: ‘Three cheers to Shannon Airport Authority for continuing their enlightened support for the ambitious UL/Frank McCourt Summer School in New York.  In one divine stroke they have enabled the two things Frank loved most—teaching and writing.  Thank you also to Joseph O’Connor and his UL colleagues for putting it all together with NYU (Frank’s Alma Mater) Glucksman Ireland House and the Irish Arts Center. Frank would feel triply blessed.”

The Summer School is open to application from everyone, whether resident in New York or willing to travel from Ireland. No previous writing experience is required, but willingness to prepare for the programme is a must. Price $300/$200student/unwaged.  Numbers are strictly limited, so book early to avoid disappointment, at http://frankmccourt.ulfoundation.com/

Details/informal enquiries: ULNY@ul.ie   Press Queries: joseph.oconnor@ul.ie or eoin.devereux@ul.ie

 

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It’s almost here! The Ogham Stone 2016 is on its way…

Launch of The Ogham Stone 2016 is only weeks away. We’ve had a sneak preview of the final draft and it looks incredible.

Expect amazing art, stunning stories, memorable memoirs and perfect poems, with contributions from Jenny Belton, Nickolas Butler, Elaine Gaston, Colum McCann, Paula Meehan, Joseph O’Connor, Mary O’Malley and Peter Robinson.

Details of when and where you can get your copy of The Ogham Stone 2016 coming very soon!

Call for submissions

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The time has come!

We are putting out the call for your submissions to The Ogham Stone Literature and Arts journal 2016.

We want your fiction, creative non-fiction, memoir, poetry, short graphic fiction, visual arts and photography.

The deadline is Monday, November 2nd, less than six weeks away.

Be sure to check out our submission guidelines here.

We look forward to discovering your work!

The Ogham Stone 2015/2016 – We’re Back!

The Ogham Stone, the University of Limerick’s literary and visual arts journal, is getting ready for your submissions for the Spring 2016 edition.

The Ogham Stone, the University of Limerick’s literary and visual arts journal, is getting ready for your submissions for the Spring 2016 edition.

Last year, almost seventy pieces were accepted for publication, including short stories, flash fiction, poetry and artwork. They featured alongside an introduction by Joseph O Connor, Frank McCourt Professor of Creative Writing at UL and multiple-award-winning Irish novelist, as well as a short story by Donal Ryan, author of The Spinning Heart, long-listed for the Booker Prize, Guardian First Book Award winner and recipient of the European Union Prize for Literature at the London Book Fair in 2015. The 2014 journal was an eagerly sought-after item, with a voracious demand for copies.

The Ogham Stone is quickly becoming a valuable platform for new writers and artists, local, national and international, to bring their work to a wide audience. We are particularly proud of our connections to the local creative communities in Limerick and last year featured work from writing and art projects active in the city, including The Heart of Limerick anthology and the ARTiculate competition.

This year, as well as accepting fiction, memoir, poetry, visual arts and photography, our new team are happy to announce that we will be seeking short graphic novels and creative non-fiction also.

Our call for submissions is imminent so browse our submissions guidelines here, buff and shine your offerings and watch this space for further details.

Finding the Best Place to Write

writing-427527_640Years ago, indeed, so many years ago that I would prefer not to reveal the actual date, I went to Spain to write a novel. I had the perfect place in mind – a small village, not too far from the Mediterranean coast. It would be a stone-built village, with narrow medieval streets, surrounded by olive groves stretching to the beach and a glimmering cobalt sea. I would take up rooms above a friendly bar/restaurant where I would have meals of hearty stew served by a beautiful cdarked-haired girl who wanted to improve her English. In the evenings, after a hard day’s writing, I would converse with garrulous old fishermen, full of stirring tales of the sea. Naturally, these would provide me with the raw materials for a novel which would stun the literary world.

Such a village did exist, once.   But I never went there. Instead, I took up residence in a tiny eighth floor flat in Barcelona, squeezed between the tourist haven of the Sagrada Familia church (the one with the spiky towers) and the all night ambulance station of the local hospital. Barcelona was and is the city that never sleeps. And neither did I. The message from the myriad bars and restaurants that I frequented was – life is for living, not for scribbling about. My novel, needless to say, did not get written.

7946581522_f7233274beWould I have written the book if I had stayed in my quiet village? Is there an ideal place to write?

Virginia Woolf’s prescription was simple. “A room of one’s own” was all that was necessary, while Stephen King offers some practical advice on what you should do with that room. “If possible,” he says in his wise manual On Writing, “there should be no telephone in your writing room, certainly no TV or videogames for you to fool around with. If there’s a window, draw the curtains or pull down the shades unless it looks out at a blank wall.”

On the other hand, JK Rowling said the best place to write is in a café. “You don’t have to make your own coffee, you don’t have to feel like you’re in solitary confinement,” she said. But then she had to write in a café – she was too broke to heat her flat, and could not bear to write Harry Potter in fingerless mittens. Incidentally, the café where she penned the first of her astonishingly successful books is now a place of pilgrimage for Potter fans. Last time I was there, an entire team of Italian footballers were being noisily photographed next to a poster of Robbie Coltrane as Hagrid. No longer a quiet place to write, then.

Truman Capote and Toni Morrison recommended motels as their favoured location to write, while Marcel Proust insisted on a cork-lined room. Other published writers have claimed to do their best work in the car, the bathroom and even the local church.

Looking back on my sojourn in Barcelona, I am pretty sure that my problem was not where I had chosen to write. I simply wasn’t ready. When you are ready, you’ll know. As Ernest Hemingway replied when asked this perennial question, “The best place to write is in your head.”

~ Patrick Kelly is a journalist and writer. He has lived in Barcelona and London. He is now studying for an MA in Creative Writing at the University of Limerick.

Thoughts One Has While Writing a Novel

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This is going to be great, like Joyce, except better than Joyce – more readable. Clever but enjoyable. Touching. Compelling. I can’t wait for my first interview on Oprah’s Book of the Month Club. My characters taught me so much, you know. They really had a life of their own. Some lines just came from God, you know. I wrote that line and thought: “That was a good line”.

Actually, this writing thing’s harder than it looks. Maybe this won’t be Joyce. I’ll settle for, like, Nicholas Sparks. He made lots of money at least. I’ll be rich and famous from these words. I can’t wait for my book to be made into a film. I can’t wait to win my first Oscar.

How many words have I written today? Phew that’s loads. Time for some coffee.

I think I’ll give myself a week off. Just ‘cos.

Oh Jesus, what did I write last week? That makes no sense at all. What are my characters doing? Just walking around talking to each other? Are my characters even characters? They’re just words on a page. Is that sentence even a sentence? What tense am I in? What tense am I supposed to be in?

I think I’ll remove that comma. There. Much better.

I think I’ll put that comma back in. There. Much better.

Actually, this is kind of Joycean.

Actually, this is nowhere near Joyce, or even Nicholas Sparks. It’s probably more along the lines of the Teletubbies. If I could write something half as coherent as the Teletubbies I’d be doing well.

Somebody publish me!

~ Niamh Donnelly

Torn Ogham Stone Logo 1The Ogham Stone editors would like to wish you all a very Happy New Year!

We are very excited about this coming year because our second edition will be released in just a few weeks! Our design team has been working day and night to create a faboulus journal and we can’t wait to share it with all of you!

Our promotion team is finalizing the details regarding the release event in Febuary and those wishing to attend are welcome!

The realse date will be announced in the following weeks so keep an eye out on our website and if you haven’t already followed us on Twitter and Facebook, the links are below!

Twitter: https://twitter.com/theoghamstone

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oghamstoneul?ref=hl

Many thanks from The Ogham Stone editors and have a wonderful new year!